Monthly Archives: January 2013

Hekaba 342-388

Polyxena: I see you, Odysseus, under your garment your right hand hidden and your face turned back, lest I touch your beard. Take heart: you have avoided Zeus of Suppliants concerning me; since I will follow both because I am … Continue reading

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Eumenides 94-197

Ghost of Clytemestra: Oh, you sleep do you? Hello! And what need is there of sleepers? And I, because of you, remain dishonoured here among the other corpses—those whom I killed their rebuke is not abandoned among the dead, and … Continue reading

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Hekaba 296-341

Choros: No man has a nature so stern, which could hear the dirge of your weeping and wailing aloud, and not cast tears. Odysseus: Hekaba, be instructed, and do not, in the anger, of your heart make hostile words well … Continue reading

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Annals of Tacitus Book I: VII-VIII

VII. But, in fact, the consuls of Rome fell to servitude, and the patricians, and the equestrians, too. By however much a man was illustrious, by that much more he deceived and they hastened, with composed countenance, so as not … Continue reading

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Eumenides 1-93

Pythia: First, I give in my prayer precedence to her of the gods first of oracles, Gaia; and after her Themis, who sits second only to her mother as prophet, so the goes the tale, and in the third allotment, … Continue reading

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Annals of Tacitus, Book I:IV-VI

IV. Therefore, since the condition of the state was overturned, there was nothing anywhere of an old-fashioned and wholesome character: everyone, once equality was despoiled, looked to the commands of the Prince, in no dread at present, so long as … Continue reading

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Hekaba 218-295

Odysseus: Lady, I expect that you know the will of the army, and the ballot brought to pass; but I shall nevertheless declare it. It is resolved by the Achaians that your child Polyxena be slaughtered upon the raised mound … Continue reading

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