Category Archives: Annals of Tacitus

Annals of Tacitus Book III: I-XVIII

I. Agrippina, given no rest, was conveyed by a voyage of the winter sea to the island Corcyra, situated facing the shores of Calabria. There she took a few days to collect her spirit, violent in her grieving, knowing not … Continue reading

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Annals of Tacitus Book II: LIII-LXI

LIII. The following year Tiberius held his third consulship, Germanicus his second. But Germanicus entered his office at the city of Nicopolis, of Achaia, to which he had come by way of the Illyrica coast, having seen his brother Drusus … Continue reading

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Annals of Tacitus Book I: LV-LXIX

LV. In the consulships of Drusus Caesar and C. Norbanus for Germanicus, a triumph was decreed although the war continued; because although it was for summer, he was preparing with utmost might, at the beginning of spring he had anticipated … Continue reading

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Annals of Tacitus Book I: XXXI-LIV

XXXI. On nearly the same days, for the same reasons, the legions of Germanica were thrown into uproar, the greater their number, the greater their violence, and with great hope that Germanicus Caesar would not be able to suffer the … Continue reading

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Annals of Tacitus Book I: IX-XV

IX. There followed much talk concerning Augustus himself, with many vacuously marvelling that on the same day both the title Prince of the imperium and also the last day of life had been received, and that in the house at … Continue reading

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Annals of Tacitus Book I: VII-VIII

VII. But, in fact, the consuls of Rome fell to servitude, and the patricians, and the equestrians, too. By however much a man was illustrious, by that much more he deceived and they hastened, with composed countenance, so as not … Continue reading

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Annals of Tacitus, Book I:IV-VI

IV. Therefore, since the condition of the state was overturned, there was nothing anywhere of an old-fashioned and wholesome character: everyone, once equality was despoiled, looked to the commands of the Prince, in no dread at present, so long as … Continue reading

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